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Wine language challenges - getting your palate in a twist

funny

#1

I read something earlier on twitter and I’m still chortling …

It made me wonder at all those words, names and terms that exist in the wine world that we may have, at some time, misspoken, or fear to even attempt.

Have you had that experience? Is there a wine or food term you may have used accidentally?

We have a famous one in my family. One member (who shall remain nameless), a young teenager at the time to be fair, walked into a large supermarket chain in Kent many years ago. As is often the case, the first aisles are the fresh produce, and the seasonal berries were in pride of place in the display areas.

In a proud, sonorous voice, this person declaimed to her mother (now several metres away), …

“Oh look mummy! Syphilis!”

Needless to say, the Physalis berries were not destined to be bought and dipped in chocolate on this occasion


#2

I have occasionally mispronounced ‘corked’ as ‘f*cked’ …


#3

One regular one that comes to mind is the misguided snobbishness associated with the pronunciation of “Moët”

… and the correct answer is ???


#4

This feels apt:

I also enjoyed this playlist for whisky pronunciation.


#5

an apt malapropism :wink:


#6

lols, I blame fat thumbs on my phone!


#7

Ooh, ooh, sir, I know, I know …


#8

I’ve managed to get this far without saying it, or hearing someone else say it…

But how do you pronounce Pauillac? Is it like ‘Poe yak’?

For now I’m also quite happy ordering Turkish or Hungarian wine online rather than trying to ask for them instore or over the phone :anguished:


#9

There are places where if you asked the question “Juhfark”

It would be answered “never on a first date” :flushed:


#10

When I first arrived in England, and started drinking wine, I used to pronounce ‘Chianti’ with a ‘Ch’ (as in ‘Church’). Thankfully, a kind soul put an end to that. As a non-native English speaker I’m sure I make the odd mistake in English too, but to balance it out- I’m good with German pronunciation, so no problems with wines from Germanic speaking regions. Wouldn’t even try to pronounce Turkish or Hungarian wines, so with you on that challenge, @Bargainbob!!


#11

10/10. Go to the top of the class!


#12

Neither would Kolonics @Alchemist


#13

Pronounced Mo-et sounding the T because Moët is from Dutch rather than French :tipping_hand_woman:


#14

Or they know better than you… :slight_smile:


#15

I think it is pronounced dom perinyon… :innocent:


#16

Pronounce the T. Didn’t know about it being of Dutch heritage but when I was learning French at school the T consonant at the end of a word was generally pronounced if followed by a word beginning with a vowel. Thus comment allez vous would sound like commen tallez vous. This was an age ago of course…


#17

Must have been overheard in Waitrose. You just cannot find syphilis in other supermarkets :wink:


#18

This rather nice Marsala has a wonderful name (pronounced Arsay!)


#19

Arf, arf. That made me laugh out loud!:rofl::rofl::rofl:


#20

I’m really trying hard not to make a glib remark about the Brighton Kemptown branch of Morrisons here :zipper_mouth_face: