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What would you do..?


#1


Asking for a friend as unfortunately these aren’t mine … But if you happened to be in the possession of the below what would you do ??

  • A) Drink them and enjoy every minute
  • B) Find a reputable merchant and flog them or
  • C) Donate to your very eager friend (Me) :rofl:

0 voters


#2

A and C. Drink it and invite your thirsty and appreciative friend.


#3

Oh that bottle looks off, I will dispose of it for you…


#4

If it was a single bottle A and C. If it is a case B, (I’d reinvest in more wine)


#5

It’s 1 of 1959 and 12 btls of 1960 :+1:


#6

For option B provenance would be key… was anyone called Hardy Rodenstock involved in the chain?

That aside I am with @NickFoster on this.


#7

I’m pretty sure Mr Rodenstock would laugh at a mere single case of d’Yqeum😂.!
But there’s also a case of this …! (1962 Chateau Climens)
The thing is, he has no interest in wine , didn’t even know what these were until he pulled them and about 70 other bottles of various regions and cru’s from under the floorboards of a recently purchased property !! :scream:… I kid you not ! I don’t know why these sort of things never happen to me :wink:!


#8

Will a merchant go for ‘under the floorboards’? It could be fine, it could be absolutely cooked. Someone might take a risk in an auction but it will be priced in.

Maybe talk to Sotheby’s and take it from there?


#9

The property was sitting empty for a while before they purchased it and most of the wine are in their original boxes and wrappings … I’ve told him to get it ALL into storage asap and then he can decide what to do .


#10

My choice?

Put a time limit on this thread then invite everyone who has contributed to assemble and taste the wines!

We have also got to bring something interesting enough to contribute to the tasting.


#11

There may be a serious point that if there is one loose bottle, opening it (perhaps with someone present from an auction house) might answer the question about the storage conditions under the floorboards…


#12

I think we should add this to the poll options :wink:


#13

Interesting and valid point :+1:


#14

It’s amazing how fashion in wine can elevate the price and also depress, in the seventies whilst living in Essex I took the wife shopping in the local new Sainsbury’s.
Whilst she shopped I wandered round the new for the time wine department, they had a row of bins along the bottom of the shelves and one had Ch Climens '66 in it which I am sure few in the store would know what it was.
I purchased just three bottles at the princely sum of around £6 each, not cheap at that time but very cheap by todays standards.


#15

Wow @Cerberus, what a great story. Have they all been consumed now? or did you hang on to any of the three ?


#16

My late father told me that Cheval Blanc was only a little more than Chianti on his favourite long closed restaurant’s wine list in the late 1960’s.


#17

Unbelievable :open_mouth:…What a time to be discovering wine.


#18

All long gone, the market for sauternes was very depressed at that time and no one wanted it, hence some ended up in Sainsbury, it was very good and I think the last bottle went down very well on its own over a long summer evening, do we still have them ?
As Nick Foster says during that period all the cru class wines were a lot cheaper, again it was the '82s that spoilt everything and the rise in price since has been relentless.
Before the effect of the '82s kicked in I also purchased at the local Peatlings wine shop, now part of Green King ? two bottles of '78 Latour of their general odds wine rack, I know, I know, at a cost of around £30 a bottle, again a lot of money in the early eighties, 82-83 from memory, that was quite nice in the nineties, never been able to afford Latour or any of the other 1st division Bordeaux since.


#19

Leah, at this same moment in time I purchased two bottles from a wine shop in Queensway Bayswater, not sure if it was Threshers or similar that had a posh wine rack to browse.
It was and remains the best red wine I have ever drunk, again it was a '66, Chambertin Clos de Beze dom Armand Rousseau the cost was about £10-11 .
Sadly it started me of buying Burgundy and the start of the most disappointing phase in my wine experience, a small fortune spent on names that never delivered so I never went back to the region, to much of an expensive gamble even when buying in good years and the “good” producers, now again at that level forget it, prices out of control.