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Tour de France 2022

Anyone interested in chatting about the Tour this year?

  • Can anyone beat Pogacar?
  • How will Jumbo-Visma cope with having two GC contenders and Wout Van Aert?
  • Who will win the Green Jersey? The sprints look very open.
  • Can Geraint Thomas make the podium for a last hoorah?

Most excitingly for us, some keen cycling friends have a chalet in Châtel, and have invited us to spend next weekend there to see the finish on Sunday. Can’t wait!

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Hard to see anyone beating Pogacar who is already ominously poised in the GC. As much as I would like to see Thomas on the podium for a final “hoorah” I don’t think he has the form or the legs anymore. Age has caught up with him as it has done with Froome following that crash.

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Admittedly we’re only three stages in, but given the lack of competition for the GC, I think this’ll be the one to watch. Given the history, a Groenewegen/Jakobsen rivalry going all the way to Paris could lead to some drama. There’s been some other great sprinting going on too (Van Aert and I’m not willing to write of Sagan although watching him and Fabio Jakobsen duelling for space on stage 2, maybe I should?).

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I’d written the possibility off until the Tour de Suisse, which made me wonder. But I’m fairly sure you’re right - too many Covid-related absences contributed to that. It would add some interest, though, and the Tour does throw up surprises - who thought that Julien Alaphilippe would be in contention for so long in 2019?

This could be really good. I was disappointed that Cavendish missed out, but Jakobsen showed exactly why he got selected on stage 2.

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Already glued to it! France’s annual tourist board freebie! Pogacar looks very sharp but I can’t help but think there might be a surprise brewing. It is the TdF after all!

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I’m more than happy to chat so thanks for starting the thread. Have a great time over the weekend too, Sunday’s stage certainly looks like a good one to watch that’s for sure :+1:

At this early stage I don’t think anything’s for certain just yet as crashes, illness, positive covid tests may play a part in determining the final outcome.

That said, I can’t help but feel presently that should the main players remain healthy it’s hard to see past Pogacar as the eventual winner. I’d also hazard a guess that both J-V’s duo of Roglic and Vingegaard will join him on the podium ( as per the betting odds ). However, if I was going to place a bet I’d be tempted to go each way on Vlasov. He’s been on great form this year and would have likely won the Tour de Suisse if not for a positive covid test.

As for J-V and the potential rivalry between their star riders. I think they’ll ride as a team, as per the Dauphine, unless something untoward occurs of course, with Van Aert providing super domestique duties for their two GC riders. Despite the pressure on Van Aert in doing so he’s such a strong and incredibly consistent rider, no matter what’s required, that he stands a good chance of taking the Green Jersey too. No doubt, things will become more clear cut once the incredibly tough Alpine stages have been completed though.

As an aside, I’m grateful, for the sake of my liver, that the route this year doesn’t seem to be as wine friendly and therefore conducive to daily drinking either :grin:

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I always find it hard to get too excited about the early flat stages but it will get more exciting on Wednesday when they hit the cobbles, and then Friday when they hit the Vosges.

I’m gutted Sam Bennett was dropped at the last minute but am really looking forward to the next three weeks.

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Well, that was a ride!

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Love that attacking, flamboyant style of cycling.:raised_hands:

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I’m really looking forward to the cobbles tomorrow, and hope we some more. I went to see Paris-Roubaix in 2018, and the roads really are farm tracks.

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I assume we’re talking about Magnus Cort and his unprecedented KoM start? :wink:

Amazing show. A proper statement.

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Sounds great - would love to see that race in the flesh.

I grew up watching the spring classics on Irish TV. Hardmen like Sean Kelly and his counterparts from Belgium and Holland were in their element in the mud and hailstones. Almost a different sport to the sunny grand tours, so it’s great to see the Tour pay tribute to that crazy part of the cycling world.

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It was really great. This was the road:

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And the group with the eventual winner, Sagan, in the rainbow jersey:

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Excellent pics, Robert! Great to pick Sagan out.

Even the type of buildings are unmistakably from NE France. Also looks like t-shirt weather which is a bonus for spectators - not always like that for that race.

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Got to feel for Phillipson who really thought he’d won today’s stage! That celebration will haunt him forever.

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It was cruel for him…he spared his own blushes by doing a funny tweet afterwards though.

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That looks great, as long as you’re not riding. Though I guess even worse in the wet and mud….let’s see what today brings

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Yesterday’s stage was so dramatic I watched the finale again this morning !

As you’ve all said, bring on the cobbles. Rather them than me though, in contrast to their suffering I’ll likely be sat on the sofa stuffing my face with snacks. :laughing:

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Do the riders have special bikes for the stages that include cobbles? Looks like mountain bikes might be better suited. Talking of which, will be interesting to see how Tom Pidcock goes today.

Have enjoyed watching the highlights show (yes, sorry, not a serious fan) ever since the great Greg Lemond competed. The TdF always gives me an extra spring in my peddling in spinning classes this time of year! And I am a big fan of Garry Imlach’s sardonic presentation style.

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Pidcock and MvdP must be amongst the favourites. If you want to see the range of adaptations over the years to cobbled riding, there is a fascinating history of attempts to include suspension, different wheels etc. To be honest, as long as it is dry, bicycle technology is such that they will be running ‘standard’ bikes, but with slightly fatter and lower pressure tyres, and thicker handlebar tape. The days of crazy innovation are over…

Here’s a good video of a bike literally snapping in two underneath someone on the cobbles [Cycling] Paris - Roubaix 2006: George Hincapie crashes - YouTube

But the Paris-Roubaix cobbles are literally like an old rutted farm track that you would think twice about driving down slowly. They aren’t the smooth cobbles of traditional European cities. Truly beastly.

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