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Top 10 Wines in UK - what are yours?

From a survey reported in Drinks Business the UKs Top 10 wines (they call them varietals, but rose and Rioja aren’t varieties

Coming in first place, presumably to the surprise of precisely nobody, is Pinot Grigio – though interestingly top spot did vary across the different nations, with Scotland preferring Sauvignon Blanc and those polled in Ireland opting for Chardonnay as their top choice.

Here’s the top 10 in full:

  1. Pinot Grigio
  2. Chardonnay
  3. Sauvignon Blanc
  4. Merlot
  5. Rosé
  6. Cabernet Sauvignon
  7. Pinot Noir
  8. Zinfandel
  9. Malbec
  10. Rioja

Not my Top 10: I don’t buy Grigio or Rose, and extremely rarely a Chablis (which is Chablis first and Chardonnay second). I love Malbec and often buy it by the glass in pubs/restaurants but since Mrs M won’t drink that or Pinot Noir I don’t have any in my cellar or buy bottles.

My Top 10 would be.

  1. Pinotage
  2. Red Bordeaux
  3. Champagne / Sparkling
  4. Montepulciano
  5. Sauvignon blanc
  6. Zinfandel (red of course!!)
  7. Grenache blends
  8. Chenin blanc
  9. Muscat dessert wines
  10. Carignan

But then I drink a fair amount of Rioja - in pubs and chain restaurants Rioja is a safe bet not to be bulk shipped

12 Likes

No Syrah/Shiraz to be seen.

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I will probably get this wrong / regret this, but my top ten in no particular order are…

  1. Pinot Noir
  2. Chardonnay
  3. Nebbiolo
  4. Riesling
  5. Cinsaut
  6. Chenin Blanc
  7. Syrah
  8. Xinomavro
  9. Kékfrankos
  10. Furmint
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Without giving myself time to over-think:

Gewurztraminer (with apologies to @peterm)

Riesling

Pinot Noir

Cab. Sauvignon

Syrah

Nebbiolo

Sangiovese

Malbec

Chardonnay

Viognier

12 Likes

I read that article and also pondered how Rose and Rioja were ‘varieties’ :smiley:

According to CT, my top ten current favourites are:

Nebbiolo
Tempranillo
Red Bordeaux blend
Tannat
Xinomavro
Semillon-Sauvignon blend
Petit Manseng
Malbec
Champagne blend
Gruner Veltliner

(of course, I used artistic license a little here - as the original writer did I might point out! - but for me, I would never list Cabernet Sauvignon/Franc as favourite individual varieties, because their magic lies in their cooperation in the bottle. Same for Champagne and it’s constituent parts, I think Chardonnay and Pinot do a far better job together.).

9 Likes

Please allow for awful spelling, and somehow I have messed up the numbering:

  1. Beaujolais
  2. Muscadet
  3. Chablis
  4. Pinot Noir (old world style)
  5. Chenin Blanc (Loire, dry)
    1. Cab Franc
    1. Grenache / Garnacha
    1. Merlot / Cab Sauv blend
    1. Dolcettto
    1. Aglianico

It depends hugely however, on who is making the wine.

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  1. Pinot Noir
  2. Chardonnay
  3. Syrah
  4. Riesling
  5. Chenin Blanc
  6. Cabernet Sauvignon
  7. Cabernet Franc
  8. Everything else….
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  1. Hock
  2. Claret
  3. Champagne
  4. Burgundy
  5. Tawny
  6. Moselle
  7. Sauternes
  8. Hermitage
    9.Tokay
  9. Malmsey

:wink:

Edit: my numbering has gone awry too, and it won’t change.

10 Likes

How has Prosecco/Glera not made this list?! (The DB article, not others above :wink:)

I’ll have a go:

  1. Grenache and blends
  2. Syrah / Shiraz
  3. Cab Sauv (Red Bdx Blends)
  4. Pinot Noir
  5. Chardonnay
  6. Nebbiolo
  7. Northern Rhone White blends
  8. Viognier
  9. Xinomavro
  10. Gamay (BJL)

Honourable mentions to Malbec, Riesling, Tannat, Sangiovese, Champagne, Tempranillo, GV, CB & Zin.

Hmmm, this list (taken from CT) tells me I need more SAF CB and Mencia in my life apparently…

8 Likes

Hock and Moselle are the same thing aren’t they? :joy:
Also, did you forget Sherry?

I beg to differ! :smiley:

Much prefer Cab Franc as a varietal than in a Bordeaux Blend (though not averse to the latter, of course).

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Sherry should probably be there. Hock is/was Rhine wine (from Hochheim originally - supposedly a favourite of Queen Victoria).

But were they both Riesling back in the day? Or was Hock a blend with large portions of MT and Kerner like it is today? (Wonderful stuff that it is)

Can’t help you with that I’m afraid! Certainly not for 19th century wine…

Red Burgundy
White Burgundy
Barolo
Mosel Riesling
Champagne
Ribera Sacra
Bierzo
Rueda
St Chinian
Bandol

I don’t rate by grape varieties. Places are much more interesting.

10 Likes

Cabernet Franc also works really well with Tannat - I think most notably Jean-Marc Laffitte uses it in his wines rather than the more popular Cabernet - but I’m afraid I’ve not really come across a 100% varietal one that was more than just ‘quite nice, but needs something more’.

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Horses for courses :+1:

Cab Franc is definitely one of my favourite red varietals, and rather than feel that it misses something - to me it speaks eloquently on its own :grinning:

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Likewise - if well made. Average C.F. can be inconsequential (and sadly there is a lot around), but from old vines with decent bottle age the improvement is enormous. This is a good example, I think we have both commented on:

https://www.thewinesociety.com/product/chinon-cornuelles-domaine-sourdais-2015

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I think you missed " Falernian"

MT dates from the 1880s, and Kerner even more recent. No, both are Riesling, but Hock normally meant from the Rhine (probably ____gau, but possibly the other regions). Are we identifying grapes, as this started, or regions or styles or throwing everything in (but that doesn’t include passetoutgrains, I hope)?

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