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Tonight's curry wine dilemma!


#1

Hello everyone!

We’re having a chicken curry tonight :heart_eyes::

(I normally go spicier, honest! This is just a nice healthy recipe.)

A few months ago, I bought a mixed case called Aromatic Whites, and I’m debating which of the bottles I have left will work best. I thought I’d use this opportunity to get feedback from all of you super helpful fellow wine fans. So, my choices are:

And (now out of stock, so no link):

Zarcillo Bío-Bío Gewürztraminer 2015
This delicious, aromatic but dry white is also from the cool banks of Chile’s Bío-Bío river. Bridging rose-petal aromas, thick texture, zingy acidity and vibrant citrus fruit, it is a benchmark gewürztraminer for the price.

I can’t remember exactly but I may also have a bottle of this left from the case:

Any thoughts? Feel free just to vote below if you don’t want to give reasons. :smiley:

  • Muscat Kuentz Bas
  • Madfish Riesling
  • Three Choirs Stone Brook
  • Zarcillo Gewurztraminer
  • Tahbilk Viognier (if I have it!)

0 voters

Thanks in advance for making my Thursday night more delicious! :slight_smile:


#2

The best success I’ve had with wine to match curry has been Gewürztraminer: I’m not really a big fan of the floral style of the wine on its own but it complements the spice flavours well


#3

There’s an understandable desire from wine retailers to convince us that wine and spicy foods work, especially given the developing markets, and it can be acceptable but imho does neither the food nor the wine any great service.

For me there’s usually a better suited alcoholic beverage. Wine before the meal but a sparkling dry cider or decent lager is my preferred tipple.


#4

Hmmm…

My only rule is to drink what you like.

There’s too much confusion about the meaning of spicy. Christmas cake is spicy, curries can be spicy, but spicy is not the same as heat from chili.

Chili isn’t hot, but it is an irritant that gives the impression of heat. It can be addictive to some and an amount of chili that seems intolerable at first becomes with repetition barely noticeable.

So what is unbearable to one seems mild to another, and while the first cannot taste anything but heat and discomfort which is alleviated by a cold lager, another person can appreciate the nuances of a good wine.

There’s no one fit solution which is why I say to drink what you like.

On this dish it seems to me it is a truly spicy curry as there is no chili at all. The creaminess added by the yoghurt element and the sweetness added by the sultanas would be the biggets factors in matching.

I wouldn’t have any of the listed wines but of them I think the Viognier would be the best match.


#5

The only one I’ve tasted is the zarcillo gewurz, which I had as part of a very basic and informal tasting I did for some colleagues/friends. I think for my taste the one I’d go for from your list would be the viognier- the others I think might be a touch too sweet and cloying with a mild creamy curry, or in the case of the riesling maybe a bit of a clash. But as @peterm says it’s definitely a case of drink what you like! Look forward to hearing which you choose and how it goes.


#6

Curry = gewurz for me :heart_eyes: but I’d be interested to know how the Stone Brook matches too.


#7

I’d probably go with Viognier myself as te peach tones in the wine will pair quite nicely with the fruitiness of this particular curry. As the curry is not hot, you don’t have to worry about the acidity increasing the feeling of heat from chillis … Enjoy and let us know what you decide on.:slightly_smiling_face:


#8

What grapes are in the Stone Brook? Doesn’t seem to say on TWS website…


#9

Depends on the curry

Heavier rich fatty curry = Alsace Riesling…it badly needs that peppery acidity
Lighter, fragrant curry = Gewurz is quite a low acid, oily wine which helps the two flavours find the right pitch


#10

70% Siegerrebe, 30% Schonburger, hope that helps… :slight_smile:


#11

? What are they?

OK - just found this:


#12

Well, the results are in!
And it’s a mixed bag… :upside_down_face:

So, I loved all your contributions and it really did make me think. When I got home and checked it turns out I didn’t have the viognier (drats! I do think it may have been perfect!) and so I went with ‘democracy’ (:grin: ) and opted for the most-voted for wine - the gewurz.

It sort of worked. I ended up using dried apricots instead of sultanas, and it definitely brought out the fruity flavours of the curry, but personally I think my curry wasn’t fragrant enough and was a little too rich for the gewurz. To be honest, the recipe was way too mild too - I should have added some chopped red chilli, and that may have made the gewurz a perfect match.

All in all, I’ve discovered I need spicier, more fragrant curry recipes to do these wines justice - but I have a case of aromatic whites left to experiment with! So any specific suggestions for a particular dish to match the wines above would be ACE.

I’m starting with a Thai green curry with the Three Choirs - even the back label recommends it, so it must be good…? :smile:


#13

That’s really interesting, thanks. To my mind the gewürztraminer would go best with a fragrant Thai green curry with a bit of heat, but after that I think you’re right about the three choirs being the best option. The muscat might be too delicate and the riesling too much lime zing, perhaps? Again though, look forward to hearing other people’s thoughts and how it works out. Thanks for being the guinea pig!


#14

So any specific suggestions for a particular dish to match the wines above would be ACE

Sorry for some reason not sure my phone can handle quoting a post, anyway I’d say the muscat may do best as an aperitif. If not it’s probably a bit hackneyed but the presumed local pairing might be something rich but not too strongly flavoured, like quiche. For the riesling, I’d say something like fish and chips (though sparkling wine might be even better), or if we’re sticking with spice, maybe Thai fishcakes?


#15

Promise me you’ll save that Muscat for the start of asparagus season. I get a little obsessed when the season rolls around and that particular wine makes them sing like nothing else I’ve tried.


Wine Wednesday [11 April 2018]
#16

Ooh, this is something I’ve never heard/tried! I have two bottles of the muscat so I’ll save one for April… how do you have your asparagus? :slight_smile:

Fishcakes is a marvellous shout! Healthy too. :slight_smile: Maybe with some light chilli dipping sauce…


#17

@laura I eat it frequently throughout the season so use it a number of ways. Probably my favourite method for a side dish is charred on a grill pan with extra virgin olive oil, sea salt and freshly cracked pepper.

However in this context I keep it simple and make the glorious veg the centrepiece with the wine. For an enjoyable Ladies That Brunch, a four minute egg and steamed asparagus for dipping. For something a little more special, perhaps a light dinner for two, steamed asparagus on sourdough toast, topped with poached eggs and drizzled with hollandaise (or sauce maltaise which incorporates blood orange).

For either of the above, I rinse off the asparagus and snap off the woody ends where they break naturally, then place in a covered steamer basket above boiling water until they change colour but still have a bite. Frou frou preparations often suggest scraping off the outside with a vegetable peeler, but I leave out this step preferring the fuller flavour, especially earlier in the season.