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Tasting order help please!

I am having a tasting with a few friends this weekend, using 11 of my favourite wines I have purchased over the last couple of months. Whilst I haves good idea of the tasting order, I could do with some suggestions as to your thoughts to ensure I have it right!! Thanks all.
Whites
1.Stadt Krems gruner veltliner 2019
2. CVNE Monopole Classico Branco Rioja 2017
3. Deidsheimer Riesling Burklin Wolf 2018
4. Land of hope Chenin blanc reserve 2020
5. Armi Thrapsathri Domaine Lyrarakis 2020
6. Coteaux du layon St Aubin. Dom cady 2017
Reds
7 Chateau Ksara Old vine Carignan 2018
8. Dom Montangeron Fleurie 2019
9. Xinmavro jeunes vignes 2019
10. Aslina Umsasane Bordeaux blend 2017
11. Heidi Schrock Blaufrankisch 2020

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I’m not familiar with all those wines, but you are, so I’ll just give general suggestions:
White before red
Dry before sweet
Light before heavy
Less mature to more mature
It sounds like you probably know all that anyway!

Sometimes it will be impossible to follow all those guidelines. In which cases don’t worry about those cases - just pick the criterion to compromise on. Likewise, if you are not sure which is the drier, heavier or more mature, it is not going to matter much, so just pick one to go first.

Don’t fret about it too much. Most of this is convention anyway and different people/cultures have different conventions, but what I suggested seems to be most common in the UK. I honestly don’t think it matters much, but some people have very firm views, and if they think the order is wrong they may get upset, and it may spoil the tasting for them - mainly for that reason I would follow convention.

Finally , if you provide water and some neutral nibbles (e.g. bread, breadsticks, Bath Oliver biscuits), then even if there is a horrendous clash between adjacent wines it should be possible to “cleanse your plalate” between wines. Having said that, immediately after having discovered a clash between wines, I usually find my palate has adjusted anyway, and I can then comfortably proceed to taste the new wine.

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Looks like a lovely list. I would think about moving the Rioja down, perhaps to fifth spot – you might not want all that oak so early on. And I know from experience that the Thrapsathri can suffer in comparison with a heavier wine, so I personally would go for that before the Land of Hope Chenin (although I haven’t tried that one).
Hope it goes well!

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Perhaps put the Coteaux du Layon at the very end - that would be my personal preference anyway.

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Quite a few on that list that I have not heard of before. Will you be sharing your notes after Mark? I for one would be interested in seeing them.

My hunch is that it might be better to have the Heidi Schröck before the Ksara. I am yet to try my first bottle of her Blaufränkisch, but the description mentions similarity to a Loire Cab Franc. The Ksara would be fuller on the palate, I think (I have tried and loved it) - so maybe best to come second or after the Beaujolais. I think the Aslina should come last of the reds…?

Agree with @CCouzens that it’ll be nice to have the sweet wine last.

Wa-Hay!!! We can have a bit of fun with this. There will be 548 different opinions. I’m not sure it will help you much :wink:

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Good list.
I’d personally put the Riesling first as I like them there.
The other way to think is in pairs or groups, so all the lighter fruitier whites together then the oaky one. So the Chenin with the Rioja and the Grüner with the Riesling.
I’d start the red flight with the Fleurie and the xinomavro, which I think as a gamay edge to it.
I don’t know about the other reds but lighter to heavier generally.
If you’re thinking in pairs you can, if you have two glasses each, pour them together which can be fun.

Opinion 549 ( :wink: @AnaGramWords )

1.Stadt Krems gruner veltliner 2019
3. Deidsheimer Riesling Burklin Wolf 2018
5. Armi Thrapsathri Domaine Lyrarakis 2020
4. Land of hope Chenin blanc reserve 2020
2. CVNE Monopole Classico Branco Rioja 2017

Reds
8. Dom Montangeron Fleurie 2019
9. Xinmavro jeunes vignes 2019
7 Chateau Ksara Old vine Carignan 2018
11. Heidi Schrock Blaufrankisch 2020
10. Aslina Umsasane Bordeaux blend 2017

  1. Coteaux du layon St Aubin. Dom cady 2017
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Did you mean 39,916,800 options?

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The lurkers will never give an opinion

You are right, I need to learn to read first before opening my mouth.

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I’d actually propose the opposite - I had this discussion with my WSET teacher (a MW student at the time) and she agreed that whilst this was orthodoxy, the whites can clear the tannic build-up on the palate a bit better, and so she (as well as I ) found whites to shine a little better when tasted second, as the palate is both awoken and isn’t fatigued by the time you’re fighting thought the last big reds.

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Others think mature followed by young is better.

As I hinted more or less strongly, my personal view is that it doesn’t make a whole lot of difference in reality.

In large walk-around tastings, I now usually drink table by table - dry whites followed by dry reds at each table - then do a final trip round the tables to try the sweet wines. I find alternating colour every few wines keeps my palate fresh, and it is also convenient.

But if you are laying on a tasting for others you need to take their wishes into consideration.

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@Brocklehurstj has read my mind ! This is the order I would also put them in , definitely start with the Fleurie and end with the St.Aubin.
The only thing I would potentially change here is swapping the Ksara and Blaufrankisch around as I don’t think this is a particularly full bodied Blaufrankisch .

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Wow!!
Thanks for all the help ladies and gentlemen!
Hopefully if I survive the tasting, I’ll write up some tasting notes to share.
I’ve still not decided on the red line-up as I need to re-taste some of the lighter ones before I decide. However the suggestions for the whites with the coteaux du layon at the end were exactly how I’d envisaged serving them ! So many thanks, bring on Friday!

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Yep. Can’t argue with your amended list. I would have done the same permutation.

Don’t want to be accused of being a lurker

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I would put the Coteaux du Layon at the end otherwise no particular thoughts. Sweet to finish off with.It is usually a lovely dessert wine.

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I’m intrigued by the notion of giving your friends a tasting. Would it be in a semi formal style? Whenever I try such a thing, it rapidly descends into chaos!

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Definitely semi-formal, ultimately it will always descend into chaos! However the trick is to defer the chaos for as long as possible. Always, ensure that you pour!, always use ISO tasting glasses, and only pour enough for evaluation. Serve each wine with accompanying food, get them thinking! Do a quiz based on the wines you’ve served, ( country, grape, price etc) with a small prize for the winner!! Basically do anything to prolong the inevitable!!

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