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Salted brisket: wine matching?

Home salted beef brisket. Rolled not flat with plenty of fat, pickled for a 7 days in brine (salt, Prague powder 2, molasses sugar, cinnamon, coriander, bay leaf, clove, peppercorns, orange peel, dried ginger). Simmered for 3 hours in slow cooker. Now cool and good to go - it’s fabulous. Sunday evening appeared still warm in late night sarney.

Below is t’interweb image to give you an idea of the dish. Not my pic, one must NEVER mix celery or carrots with mash. tsk.

Tonight (and tomorrow) most likely with mashed potato, leeks and gravy - maybe some white cabbage. No doubt a fried egg or two will feature at some time. I will post some pics of course.

But what to drink with this food of the God(s)? first instinct is Alsace Riesling, but not Gewürztraminer despite the spices in the brine, simply because I prefer my whites very dry.

Or maybe a red… Loire cab franc, or a Bordeaux blend with a decent proportion thereof.

Suggestions?

corned-beef-and-cabbage5-1-of-1

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For me, having made something similar, I find a juicy southern Rhone works well ! Enjoy :wink:, proper winter warming food there .

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Hmm. southern Rhone, I have a few Ch9DP lurking in the wine rack waiting for a moment to shine.

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Given your preference for whites, maybe a bigger white rioja?

If you’re going red either a Cote du Rhone or a bigger Beaujolais, something nice and juicy with plenty of dark and red fruit?

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Not quite the same but I did a 10 hour smoked BBQ brisket yesterday and found it went really well with Peter Lehmann H&V Barossa Shiraz. The sweetness and robust nature of the fruit in the wine went really nicely with the richness and depth of flavour in the meat. I am guessing it wont work quite the same if your brisket isn’t done on the BBQ but as a bit of meat it definitely needed something juicy and hearty.
The suggestion of something from Southern Rhone sounds good too.

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I would say first instincts of Alsace Riesling/Pinot Gris sound right to me - theres that semi-Germanic feel to cured/brined/smoked meats that I think rings true. Or, perhaps German Riesling.

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Nice! Or how about a gruner with a bit of age on it? If you happen to have something like that laying around…

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That’s a good shout!

Sounds delicious, I’d like to try a big and very naughty Wachau Smaragd Riesling with this. I’d probably also open a Châteauneuf-du-Pape as reliable backup.

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Châteauneuf-du-Pape, clearly the majority suggestion (funny, wouldn’t have crossed my mind) and being a Monday night I could not justify a posh bottle & opened a 2017 Co-op Ch9 which had been in the wine rack a year or so. REALLY good match. Many thanks to everyone!

Very much looking forward to a re-match tomorrow evening, pretty much the same dish but the Ch9 will have been open 24h, and I wont overcook the cabbage. Oh… and photos will happen.

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