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Red Wine and ... Cola?


#1

Surely… NOT??? Is this an urban myth??:scream::scream::scream: Does this really happen??I am appalled (&wish to hit them very hard over the head to instill some sense!)


Have we had our fill of coffee?
#2

i think when the wine market was emerging in China it may have been true - then, as for some now, wine was a signal of status…


#3

You’re right!!! A lemonade spritzer is far superior!


#4

Every time someone does this, a vine in Pauillac withers and dies. Fact.


#5

You might find this article of interest regarding wine and coke. Seems such a terrible waste of a nice glass of wine when it happened in the past…but apparently they don’t do it now.

https://edition.cnn.com/2014/09/22/world/asia/china-wine-myths/index.html


#6

I prefer with Irn Bru


#7

I have heard about the Spanish enjoying red wine with coke, it is quite common (rough red wine, nothing special like an expensive claret. I haven’t ever tried it, but this article mentions it. Personally, if it is too warm for red wine and I am thirsty I go for a lager, or a soft drink…but who would have thought Guinness and champagne would work together, maybe I’m missing something and should try some cheap red wine and coke, even if it sounds revolting?


#8

I’ve seen plenty of Calimocho in Spain and also been to loads of every-day lunch places that serve their own young red wines to be drunk with lemonade mixers (that’s for everyone, including workers).

The thing with these is that we are used to drinking a certain class / level of bottled, finished and high-quality wines that deserve to be savoured on their own … but this is for wine regions where there is also plenty of generic wine to be consumed, and it sometimes needs a certain help!


#9

Yeah, I remember I found myself out drinking with some locals in Slovenia years ago and when it was my round, someone asked for a “[Slovenian word long forgotten]”, which I had to memorise and repeat at the bar, and which turned out to be red wine and coke. Had a sip and it tasted okay, but its flavour might have been improved by everything else I’d been drinking since the afternoon.

Lovely people, invited me to an all-day BBQ knees-up down by the Italian border the next day. Wish I could remember what they called the redwineandcoke now…


#10

google says:

It’s also known as “jote” in Chile and “bambus” in Slovenian nations.


#11

Thanks Robert. I am surprised the vineyards persist in making the rough wine in large quantities, but there is evidently a demand for it. I suppose some rough wine is destined for wine vinegar for culinary uses too? Not all vines will produce grapes of sufficient quality for the £6+ bottle market…and rather than waste the grapes they do get used, albeit for a rustic wine to go with the coke.


#12

YES! Thank you! Blimey, that takes me back.


#13

Don’t forget that in MANY wine producing areas, much of what is grown and made is for personal / local consumption. Not everything is meant as ‘vin de garde’

In Rioja, for example, (IIRC) 50% of vineyards are owned by families who own less than 1 hectare so they (maybe) sell grapes to the local winery, or keep (some of) them to make wine for the family. That will be true for plenty of local restaurants too who have ‘local’ production.

A fair amount of wine production is not by professional wineries but by keen amateurs


#14

I have seen diners adding cola to glasses of decent red wine in an up-market restaurant in Thailand,Whether they were Thai or Chinese I can’t remember.

But wine was ferociously expensive thanks to punitive taxes and I think ordering a bottle of expensive wine to the table was a wealth statement, and not because they liked red wine.


#15

I really do know someone who drinks red wine (any red) and coke!


#16

Had my fill of Calimocho in Spain over the years but this is purely to sweeten up painfully young red wine and from memory is most popular amongst teenagers (Think pints of snakebite).


#17

Yes, I have had loads of the stuff at that age in Hungary. It has different names based on the proportions you mix, but is more generally referred to as VBK (an abbreviation of red wine cola) or Leo (for reasons unbeknown to me).


#18

So how should we best make one? That is, what’s more important in the mix: the quality of the wine or the quality of the cola? Has anyone here done a taste test?


#19

I had no idea this existed outside of uni pre-drinks! Corner shop cola mixed with whatever red was cheapest often provided the necessary fortification to go out in January without a coat!

No one’s going to tell me that cheeky Vimtos exist in the “real world” too are they?!


#21

Maybe you could do the relevant research for the good of the community and report back?? @Herbster
:rofl::rofl: