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Reading is not just for Christmas, but

books

#41

I could never get far with Moby Dick either despite managing happily War and Peace, Anna Karenina and many others. It was just too dense.
It was one of the first books I didn’t finish, as a matter of principle. Now though I’m willing enough to give up on books if I’m not enjoying them after a reasonable effort. There are plenty of others to read and enjoy.


#42

Agree. A lot of books get a 100 page probation.

My favourite most recent read (within the last few years) was Stoner by John Williams. It was so moving.


#43

I know - I should feel ashamed, but it really just didn’t grab me, regardless of its brevity. Similarly, my other half did not get on at all with Conrad’s The Heart of Darkness, and that’s a short one (and an excellent book in my opinion), and gave up.
Perhaps, like wine, life’s too short for sticking with books one doesn’t enjoy :blush:


#44

I read Heart of Darkness and enjoyed it. And when I tried to re read it, I couldn’t finish it!
I think there are probably books you can read at certain points in your life, so there may be a little bit of luck involved.


#45

Stoner is an excellent book. And I had no trouble with Heart of Darkness. Another of my favourites is Waterland by Graham Swift, a wonderful book.


#46

I tried Last Orders by Swift, and didn’t finish it.


#47

Last orders is ok but nothing like as good as Waterland.


#48

I agree! There are a number of books I enjoyed in my youth, but struggled with re-reading later on in life. The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde is one; 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is another.

There are many, though, which I relish re-reading, and the enjoyment is undiminished.


#49

No 73 Inbar woe is me


#50

Well, I really enjoyed it in my teens - so there is hope yet…! :wink:


#51

Stoner was a prime example of this for me. I thought it was great first time, but second time it floored me.

You can’t trust the opinion of the guy you used to be.


#52

Talking about enjoyment and stamina: Ivanhoe - I lasted two paragraphs. I’ve never gone back!


#53

Written 3 miles away from me.


#54

You’ve aged well!


#55

A very good read - the first few chapters seemed sparsely written, but very moving. Altogether a somewhat melancholic storyline, but very well written and absorbing.

Currently enjoying Sebastian Faulks 'Where my heart used to beat’ Two-thirds the way through and hoping to finish soon. Many books bought, still to read…


#56

Not unlike wine purchases… :grinning:


#57

There’s a Japanese word for the book version: Tsundoku: The art of buying books and never reading them. Perhaps we should invent the vinous version?!


#58

Fine writer, and member of The Wine Society to boot …
I love his von Igelfeld series.


#59

Inbar, I couldn’t agree more! My least favourite genre must books about the war. The last one I read was Atlantic Front, written in 1941 by somebody called Basil Woon. Of course, it was censored, which made it all the more wince-making to read. The patronising style actually made me laugh, which couldn’y have been the intention. But after 50 pages or so, I gave it to the local charity shop.


#60

Jack Reacher?