If you could only drink one wine

He he he, don’t worry. I bet The Society can deliver to whatever desert island you get marooned on :slight_smile:

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I adore most Rhône type wines, BUT if honestly faced with that question it would have to be Roc de Cambes from the Cote de Bourg district in Bordeaux.
Made by an eccentric, one of a kind genius called Francois Mitjavile, he conjured up the now hugely lauded Tertre Rotebouef in Saint Emilion from virtually nothing.
The Roc is his 2nd crack of the whip and is a third of the price but just behind Tertre in quality.
Great Bordeaux vintage or indifferent Roc always delivers, whilst not cheap.
I think all wine lovers should have the taste of Roc in their vineous lexicon.
It, for me is luscious and voluptuous and quite feminine in personality, pure hedonistic pleasure in a glass, once tasted, never ever, to be forgotten.
Guigal, Chave, Jaboulet, Rostaing, Perrin, Graillot, Raspail-Ay have all stolen my heart at one time or another but like Halley’s Comet I am drawn back to my true love with metronomic regularity.
No question, THE Roc for me!

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aoc Savennieres, Clos du papillon, Domain du Closel, been drinking it for 20yrs… its such a shame its so popular now, so its price has more than doubled. £31.50 uk, But its the flintiest, raciest, driest, fruitiest most complex white wine you’ll ever drink. Its a Loire Chenin Blanc such a versatile grape in the right hands, particularly in this small AC and definitely in the hands of the wonderful ladies that nurture it. At the vineyard you feel transported into an almost pre revolution environment, then a TGV zooms past a few 100m away! France in all its glory.
So if you open a 5yr old it will taste totally different to the same vintage in 10yrs…its a wonderful voyage…you’ll never be disappointed. Great on its own but even better with Sandre (fish) if you can find it in a local restaurant.

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…and then i got round to opening my first bottle from a case of 1996 Cos Estournel.
Ok I’m biased; i think '96 Bordeaux’s may have been the last “real” Bordeaux vintage where someone with an education in wines of Bordeaux could still differentiate by terroir and vintage.'96 was never considered the best year, but it really has matured into something quite sublime. It was a tannic mobster in the early days (we could all afford to buy them for £25 in auctions, b4 all the fakes destroyed that route) but it always had complexity and a range of tight fruit trying to punch its way out, so it held promise! OMG is it now sublime?..its fresh, even light but fruity, a touch savoury, but it’s so well balanced with still a stiff upper lip structure but the acidity is perfect. We opened a 2nd half way through the 1st, and it was perfect from a decanter in 20mins, so this vintage (in my cellar) is ready to drink now, now. (Tell me how many of us have had a sublime Burgundy from a case only to find to our cost that bottle no2 and 3 are like vegetable juice…isn’t that a s…) This is sublime with lamb… and bizarrely how do these older wines perk up the conversation instead of drowning it? IMHO only the 2009 vintage out of all these supposed beauts of 2000 2005 2010 comes close to the promise of 1996. Get the 96’s now and drink them now… they’re GRRReat!

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Totally agree about the 96 Bordeaux. Drunk too many of mine too young. Left bankers will go on for years. Yes they where/are austere, but that kind of tension is what can lead to greatness.

I’ve actually been wondering where to get hold of them - I have a thread about this because it is our anniversary year and I MUST get around to scoring some before they get too rare / expensive for the likes of me

its not easy. Farr vintners are always a great source of Bdx’s but you need to buy a few £00’s worth in cases. Even there selection of '96s is very ltd and mainly to the big name expensive stuff. I reckon one of the other links to Berry bros sounds like your best bet. As to the BDX 96s lasting out to their 25th yr. I’m sure some will but they will need to have been cellared well. imho, going by the dozen or so left bank 2nd, 3rd and 4th growths i’ve tasted this year are drinking now, they need very ltd decanter time, and they weren’t even close to drinking last year. So you just never know they may dip, they may go on for another 20yrs. I wouldn’t risk it when they’re as good as this.
One last idea. We had a small enthusiasts buying team and we always got some cracking bargains at the mthly wine auctions at Straker & Chadwick, Abergevenney, Wales. Nice part of the country for a w/e too. Are they still running, and how many old Bdx you pick up in auction these days are real or fakes. its a conundrum… good luck.

and that sort of tension is not in modern bdx fruit monsters of the great new vintages. I now struggle to guess the AOC let alone the vineyard. And how they’ll age is anybody’s guess. Somehow i think the majority of punters don’t really care. Even in France now, its exceptional to find a restaurant that’s selling a Bdx more than 6 yrs old so you get these dog awful 2011/12/13/14 pushed on you that are unrecognisable to the real thing. Still the quality of the cheaper Bdx’s has improved tremendously so that kinda counterbalances it… nah not really! The days when the 2nd level wines were still affordable disappeared with the rise of Big big money, and will never return to bless us.

Pedro Benito Urbana Rioja from Cuzcurita near Remelluri for me. Such fantastic wines at bargain prices. Happy that TWS now stocks the crianza. The full range made is actually mind boggling!

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I could drink Barolo until the cows come home. And I mean traditional Barolo, the likes of Bartolo Mascarelo, Roana, Vajra. And if I could do it with the local food even better, with loads of delicate pasta dishes and plenty truffles!

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Barge duPlessy '99. About 5 years ago. No such thing as great wines, just great bottles, as they say :slight_smile:

If it were just one appellation I’d possibly stick my neck out with Otago. Covers my Burgundy love with some cracking Pinot Noir of varying styles and some great Chardonnay but wins over with a bit of variety from some lovely Rieslings

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The best Sauternes I can afford… If that was out of the question then a Leon Beyer Gewürztraminer. I sure hope this scenario doesn’t materialise!! :fearful:

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@Inbar Keep an eye on the website in the next few weeks and you might find a pleasant surprise re Beyer gewurz.

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Thanks for the tip. @Tim_S! :wink: I shall keep my eyes peeled…

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Red…Mas du Soleilla, les Bartelles…whatever vintage is on offer !!!

White…Chateauneuf du Pape, Famille Perrin, les Sinards

If neither is available any Hirondelle will do !

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Meursault for me too.

Hugel Schoelhammer Riesling for me :slight_smile:

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I’m with you there Nick, Riesling encompasses a huge range of sweetness levels and styles. Early drinking, those made to age, and price levels for all.

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Pommard.
That’s it!
:wine_glass::+1:

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