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I couldn't drink the wine - a first

I’m slightly disappointed, was expecting another great photo.

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True, although we have finally found a vineyard that’s not been visited!

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As others have said, English/Welsh Wine is made from grape grown in England/Wales.

British wine is made in Britain from imported juice and/or dried grapes and/or condensed juice. Just add water, sugar and yeast.

It’s a legal definition between English/Welsh and British Wine

Used to be more common, British Sherry , ‘tonic’ wines, and so on.

Yes @Brocklehurstj Mrs M has an amazing palate - but I still don’t know how she picked British wine, unless it was so bad she didn’t think it was real wine

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Pedant alert: Abigail is never seen in the play - she’s in the adjacent party.

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Damn you’re so right. She was Beverly. That’s not pedantry but basic knowledge I fell short of.

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I too visited vineyards in North Fork, Long Island. I thought the wine we tasted there was excellent - the ones I recall were Lenz, Paumanok, Bedell and I can’t recall the rest.

But owners and winemakers change, new wineries come along and old wines close or are replaced.

Most small wineries in the USA seem to exist by acting as a location to visit. hire or get married in, rather than solely through their wine. But I think the ‘Three Tier System’ is the main cause because if a distributer doesn’t buy their wines they can’t get them in shops. And distributers would rather deal with large producers

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Lenz was the only one I visited that I actually enjoyed the wine.

The other two we visited were Raphael and Osprey’s Dominion, the latter being particularly bad.

Try this one by way of a consolation

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Well played!

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One of my favourite things, Alison Steadman in a Mike Leigh production :smiley:

If you are “up North” and are looking for a visit somewhere, try Dunesforde Vineyard. Their Blanc de Noir is really REALLY good.
(Obviously the grapes come from further south but that’s just a small detail .)

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I’ll next be in the area in February, which really isn’t the best time of year for vineyard visits (pruning isn’t really my bag!). I’ll investigate when I’m there in more summertime times!

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Another point is that it’s not made by them either…

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Who makes it ?

On their website they state that Halfpenny Green is their winemaking partner.

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Their sparkling wines are cheaper :slight_smile:

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I confess that I’ve never watched the play, only court bits and bins on repeat.
However a friends bother and sister in law are so into it (and know it by heart) that they insisted we act it out at a Christmas party. Odd as nobody else knew the play and it was an evening I’ll never get back, but strangely memorable in hindsight.

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Many years ago I was in the Hunza Valley in the far north of Pakistan. They grow apricots, and the rumour is they also make an alcoholic drink (or wine). I stayed in a guest house, and after much negotiation, agreed to buy a bottle, a Frenchman to buy two, and another friend, one. We had to supply our own bottles, and were taken out at dead of night for the transaction. The supplier arrived, we paid our money, and filled our bottles from a plastic container labelled “brake fluid”. I didn’t even risk putting the stuff, which was oily and coloured green, in my mouth. The Frenchman took a sip, and spat it out. The supplier went away happy with his money.
Without doubt, the worst “wine” I’ve never actually tasted.

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Completely agree, only 30:mins from us and we’ll worth a visit

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All the folk I met in the Hunza happily told me the Quran only talked about the fruit of the vine and carried on smoking their cannabis with big grins on there faces. Almost every field I saw their had a bunch of plants growing in one corner! They were happy! (And seriously lovely people!)

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