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How good is this really!


#1

As I have said before I am selling later this year most of my “good stuff” almost all of which is in bond, for reasons I have explained .
I needed to put together all my wines and retired to CellarTracker for the task, most are on there now and the residue will follow soon, no everyday wines have gone up as they don’t hang around long enough anyway !
Today I put up this wine…

I purchased just three bottles awhile ago, at great expense, in fact per bottle it is the most expensive wine I have purchased apart frrom a couple of other wines many moons ago.
Unusually I made rough notes on this one, I do make some notes but to be honest being analytical with a wine in front of me rather spoils the enjoyment, yes say what you think to others and listen back, but writing and drinking when I am supposed to be enjoying the wine and the company is a bit off putting.
Anyway I did write notes and put them up on CellarTracker for what that is worth.
But I have a pretty good memory for good wines at all the price points, so this did stay in the old grey matter as one to remember.
What one has to try and put out of ones mind when drinking wine like this is the cost because it influences your judgement, especially at this level, this is one of those wines and producer whom one never hears a bad word about, all is sublime and in honesty it was very enjoyable, probably needs more time and the other two bottles will bear this out or not.
Yet thinking back to when it was consumed on my wifes birthday which unfortunately for me is Halloween, frog and toad etc, I find it difficult to put this bottle anywhere near the best wines iv’e drunk, of course we go back to personal taste subjectiveness etc and someone else will have a different view on it, but in the end the price does come into it, not at the time of drinking but on reflection it is an awful lot of money for a wine that failed to deliver a better experience than quite a few £20 bottles that have passed my way.
The trouble with buying this type of wine is the chance of tasting first is nil, so reputation as written over the years is all you have to go on, amazingly CellarTracker reviews on this wine do vary a lot with many thinking quid pro quo it is not worth the money, I hope to be proved wrong with those two other bottles some time in the future, though my experience with very good,( on paper) Barolo’s does not hold out that much hope.


#2

I have not drank a wine from this area in the class of Gaja but I can imagine it needs another 5 years to open up. Like burgundy these wines can go into a shell.
My experience of expensive fine wines are that when they fail to give ultimate pleasure it can be devastating.
I too have sold wines that I own as I can’t justify drinking them at their current price and as i get older I find just as much pleasure from wines in the £10-25 bracket just as satisfying.
I have kept a lot of wine back for the future but current wine for drinking on the society’s list can hit the same spots👍


#3

I think the problem with the old adage “this needs more time” and try again in five years, is the fact that no one knows for sure it will improve, some of course do, others never.
And for us mere mortals, who can’t afford to buy a case of this or similar wine and dip in every few years to see if the product is at peak drinking, that is an even more expensive scenario, even wine critics who have access to these wines on a regular basis often contradict themselves with predictions on when a wine will be ready or not, the truth is they don’t know.

The trouble with expensive wine is that despite the technical advances it is still an inponderable in these circumstances so we take a risk, a risk we would not take with any other product, after all if the worst case scenario happened and the wine was faulty who can take back a £200 bottle after waiting twenty years to open, it is caveat emptor and it is difficult to think of anything else that compares.
I have drunk enough decent and expensive wines to accept all that, but the truth is many do not live up to the hype, as many who have put their money down for “decent” Burgundy’s and Barolo’s in particular will attest.


#4

@cerberus you have my sympathy and I agree that sometimes expense is no guarantee of quality. A quick check on Jancis Robinson shows an underwhelming score and note in 2015 that suggests trying again in a few years (though not I suspect with confidence). Co-incidentally I drank this tonight - same year, similarly underwhelming tasting note on JR but absolutely delicious. All I can suggest is to keep kissing frogs…


#5

I have had an interesting time putting my wines up on Cellar Tracker to collate what I have got in my cellar and various storage sites.
Having reached the end of the wines for upload, well almost, I started to put in some tasting notes and remembered I did have a few older ones, having dug them out the thread that I did on Arneis raised it’s ugly head, the three “top” producer ones that I had were all pretty damning, they being Giacosa, Ceretto and Vietti, Vietti being the most recent, but the best I have managed to find in recent years was from Malvira a relatively inexpensive version, it could be that I was very unlucky , though the one from Ceretto had no excuse at all, rubbish, but it does partly prove that not all that is paved in gold delivers the goods