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How Does Your Grammar Grow?


#61

Bairn is still in common use in the North East


#62

Isn’t etymology a fascinating thing?!.. :face_with_monocle:


#63

Yes, I love insects … oh, … :wink:


#64

I wonder what the Etymology of Entomology is…?! :wink:


#65

It’s ephemeral…:wink:


#66

It most certainly is :+1:! Also my northern Irish friend also uses Wean/wain for children too.


#67

Ulster and Southern Scotland are pretty intertwined in many ways…


#68

One of my fav Lancashire colloquial phrases is “nobbut a cockstride away” "very near to":boom::roll_eyes::rose:


#69

Watching The Bridge, I was intrigued to find that the Swedes also say ‘braw’ for ‘good’, just like Paw Broon.


#70

Indeed! They write it as ‘bra’… Which caused no end of amusement in my Swedish class. We weren’t a mature lot!


#71

“Arl plodge in the claggy clarts if ya hoy us a ha’p’ny hinny.”
Any one up for that translated from Geordie into propa Queen’s prose?

This text will be blurred[/spoiler]“I would step into the deep, thick mud if you would only throw me half a pence, Mrs.”


#72

Hinny is the only word I recognise. And that’s only due to the Unthanks song Here’s the Tender Coming (beautiful song!).
I love the variety and uniqueness of English dialects!


#73

After 10 years still trying to understand Bristolian.