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Have you ever played any wine-themed games?

Hi guys!

As we’re all trying to find ways to keep us amused at the moment, I wondered if any of you have ever played/recommend any wine-themed games?

@MrLaura and I used to write a wine blog and we were sent a few to try, but didn’t have a great deal of luck. One game we did find quite fun was wine-themed Top Trumps:

(Currently OOS, unfortunately!) Which was silly but fun.

There was also a wine board game called Corkers once, which we found fun but the range of questions were either way too easy or ridiculously hard!

Anyone else had any luck with these?

As a fan of both wine and board games, I can’t imagine tying to pick board games because they have a wine theme. Since board games seem a really good way to amuse ourselves away from screens in lockdown, do you mind if I hijack the thread to ask for recommendations more generally?

In the spirit of starting things off, two (pretty much classics these days) that have been around for a while that I like are Labyrinth (relatively quick, not too mindless and enough variation to play a few times in a row with up to 4 people) and Hive (pure strategy game strictly 2 player - think chess style - that if you started from scratch wouldn’t start with an experience mismatch).


https://www.gen42.com/games/hive

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Not exclusively wine - as it also involves beer, whisky and (optionally) lighter fluid - but there’s a game where you watch Withnail And I and you have to keep up with them.

If I remember the film correctly … if you make it to the final scene, you get a Margaux :+1:

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Does the Margaux appear in your rack or does someone drop it off?

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Ibble Dibble with a burnt wine cork

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Uncle Monty no doubt. He keeps a sensational cellar.

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:joy: !

We did use a burnt wine cork for a quiz once on holiday - we took it in turns asking general knowledge questions, and if you got a question wrong you had to mark your face with the (cooled down, obvz!) ash from the burnt cork.

My poor mother-in-law forgot all about the game after we’d played it, went to bed and got a huge fright in the middle of the night when she went to the bathroom and saw her reflection in the mirror, with her face covered in black splodges!

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Most wine-themed games seem to be dreary trivia type things. Here’s a list of more obscure games with a wine theme:

https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgamefamily/8496/theme-wine/linkeditems/boardgamefamily?pageid=1&sort=rank

But it’s an underused theme in serious games! You’ll probably need a large glass to get through a few of the rulebooks though :wink:

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I agree with you Tom. A friend and I looked into wine games quite recently and felt that they could be broadly divided into 3 distinct groups. Firstly the knowledge based games, which tested your wine knowledge to date and if you got questions correct you advanced in some way (often on a board) and if you got the question wrong you went backwards. Sometimes this reversal is described in wine terms (eg your vineyard has been hit by a hail storm - go back three spaces). These games often involve cards, counters and boards and can be quite slow paced we felt.
Secondly there are drinking games dressed up as wine appreciation games.
Finally we identified wine tasting games which presumed little or no previous knowledge. In these games/activities participants aren’t asked wine related questions but instead they taste wines (sometimes blind, often matching up wines with descriptions) and are asked to identify key properties of the wines. However, we found many of these games to be overly wordy and sometimes complicated to run. As a result of our exploration we decided to invent our own simple and fun game to fill this near gap in the market
Here is a link to our website
https://www.whatsmywine.co.uk/
Our game also has the added section of asking people to be creative and to describe the wine. It’s v straightforward and helps you to learn about wine as you are playing without being didactic. We’ve also recently realised that it’s good to play as a simple two/three player game during this extended lock-down period. Simply cover one or two bottles in a sock and use the dials to work out what’s inside the bottle - a quick 10 min game before dinner (ie dispense with The Pitch section as you need more people to that bit properly).
Anyhow I would be really interested to know what anyone thinks of our idea. And whether I have missed any good games out there?

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Labyrinth is great - my son loves it (especially when he can push you off the board!) - have standard and Harry Potter versions

Highly recommend

a great game for with a glass. (or 10)

I ibble dibble number 3…

Normally around the dinner table, but could easily be online in some way, preferably glass in hand: Desert Island wines or Favourite six grapes, and why. More fun than it sounds, tho’ less for the non wine geeks (as usual, some of them might say…)!

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The simple and best game. Buy a load of half bottles from TWS, blind them, get someone else to number them up randomly and then someone with less wine knowledge to pour (so you don’t see bottle shape). Give everyone a list of the possible wines, with maybe one or two extra descriptions as red herrings, a WSET aroma and flavour tasting sheet and away you go! Great for those who know a bit and just as interesting for those that don’t. :grin::wine_glass::clinking_glasses:

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Forgot the pics!

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We came across What’s My Wine? game a couple of months ago at a friend’s house. I know a very little about wine (basically what I like!) and am certainly no expert but really enjoyed it. I learnt a bit, drank a glass or two more and generally had a lot of fun. We had six of us playing but I can see it could work with just two or three. Would certainly be happy to play it again.

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Looks promising, although I think there is a reason a wine themed game has never really taken off, which is that us lot here are in a distinct minority in wanting to talk about wine! Most people just want to drink and enjoy it, not analyse it. An article by Richard Hemming on Jancis Robinson.com in 2018 says that 96% of the wine sold in the UK is under £9 a bottle. I have tried to design a wine game as well, and I incorporated ideas that meant it could be enjoyed by those not wanting to get involved in the ‘wine aspects’ (apart from drinking the wine), as well as by the wine geeks. But I have certainly not got as far as you. I really like your wine wheel idea, and it looks nicely packaged. I’d quite like to see the full rules if you could post them here? Good luck!

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We too have had some fun with the whatsmywine game. Nothing to intimidate those whose principal interest is just in drinking but it has the potential to engage players in widening that interest. The game also gives opportunities for the geeky to indulge their passion and show off.

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OK. I’ll have a look and see if I can post the simple one page rules later today. It would be interesting to hear how your game has developed and any differences to what’smywine?
Thanks for the positive comments on the game above. It’s good to see that word is spreading and that people are having fun with wine!

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I worked on mine a few years ago but it’s on the back-burner at the moment. I’m thinking of it as a ‘retirement project’ and I’m not far away from that now. :blush:

Here are the rules and tasting notes plus flags. The photos are a bit rough and ready as I can’t upload PDFs on this site. Would you be interested to hear yours and others thoughts.

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