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Grato Grati Rosso Toscana Vecchia Annata 2006 & 1999


#1

Just received an email re these 2 aged Sangiovese:

The email reads:

On a recent visit to the Grati family in their beautiful spot in Chianti’s Rufina Valley, we heard about something rather exciting: they had been keeping some older reds in large old oak vats (known as botti ) as a bit of an experiment to see how they aged.

Naturally we were keen to try them, and two of them – a fully mature 20-year-old and a complex 2006 – really stood out. We leapt at the chance to secure them for members and recommend them highly.

Buy them here

The theory behind the Gratis’ experiment is that wine ages more quickly in smaller units, where the ratio of oxygen to wine is highest. Therefore, if kept in larger volumes in (for this purpose, neutral) oak vats, the wines may age more slowly, retaining freshness and elegance whist softening and developing more complex flavours.

For members, that means the rare chance to try two mellow, aged and ready-to-drink sangioveses from a great estate. Don’t miss out!

More temptation I think I may find hard to resist…


#2

Right up my street!

But shame they don’t come in 6s. Oh well.


#3

This one might be a bit different, I don’t know - but I had a similarly aged one from Grato Grati last year - a 1991, bought via Majestic (I think @Herbster tried it too?):

https://www.majestic.co.uk/wines/grato-grati-rosso-di-toscana-13483

If these ones are as satisfying, than they’ll be a treat for sure! The Majestic one was a Chianti Rufina in all but name, I believe.


#4

Yes I saw reference to very similar if not the same wine on CellarTracker- reviews on there mentioned sold by Majestic.

Not sure therefore how much of an ‘experiment’ these wines are, though do sound tempting and certainly a little different.


#5

I would say- based on an experience of one wine, mind you - that they are likely to be excellent value for money. We thoroughly enjoyed the 1991 which was still alive and fresh tasting, with clear fruit but also nice tertiary development, as you would expect. Definitely worth a punt for those interested!

Here are my notes from the one I tried.


#6

Thanks @woodap. I’ve been on the lookout for a 1999 for a 21st celebration dinner for my daughter in a few months. Just put a few in the basket and I’ll report back.


#7

Anyone know why this isn’t labelled as a Chianti?


#8

’ The wines from the Rufina are known to be particularly long-lived exemplars of Sangiovese, as is proven by some special Vecchie Annate offerings…old vintages, the first two of which (1990 and 1991) could not then have been classified Chianti, being 100% Sangiovese (laws changed in 1995, allowing wines of 100% Sangiovese to be considered Chianti). They are called Grato Grati, and are indicated Vino da Tavola (pre-90’s) or IGT Toscana. The name Grato Grati was the name of Gualberto’s grandfather. In addition, the wines are kept in botti (large barrels) until 3-6 months before their release, which is for far too many years to retain the Rufina DOCG designation. Which - side benefit - helps avoid many problems associated with corks.’

From http://www.wwcellars.com/our-wineries/italy/grati/


#9

MWW have sold several vintages over the years, at around the same price. Worth trying certainly.


#10

Had some Grati years ago and definitely not top notch. Of course these days the top-notch stuff is out of my league :roll_eyes:


#11

I tried the 2006 tonight with some meatballs in tomato sauce.

I was excited to try such a mature wine, but it was a mild let-down. Extremely smooth and with plums, leather and red apple, but overall a bit too laid-back to be exciting and not developed enough to be properly interesting. Maybe worth holding a bit longer?