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Drink Dates - Again!

Browsing the Christmas list I noticed the Penfolds Grange 2014 available in a mixed case which unfortunately I will not be buying. It’s “Drink now to 2044”. If I were lucky enough to get a bottle of this I certainly wouldn’t be drinking it now, or probably for at least 10-15 years.

My question is: if you got a bottle and didn’t or couldn’t get more for whatever reason, would you drink it now, or would you wait? Drinking it now seems like infanticide to me. Surely it will get better!

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I would give it 15 or 20 years.
In my opinion, broaching that bottle now would be vinous infanticide.
The Society should offer the option to store such a long lived single bottle in the Society reserves. Currently, they do not.
By doing that the purchaser could see the bottle at it’s best.
Storing it in a modern house for an extended period, would be less than optimum. :frowning_face: :dragon:

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With a drink date of now to 2044 I wouldn’t be opening it for at least 10 years.

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A drink range of Now till 2044 isn’t saying that the wine will be better in future, it’s just suggesting one drinks it before 2044, i.e. I read it that the winebuyer/producer are pretty confident that it won’t be past it in 2044.

We have different tastes and some don’t like aged wine and prefer the freshness of young wines.

As for TWS keeping the wine and releasing when they think it’s at optimum drinking - it’s a quandary as other merchants will be selling it now and why should they lose customers to them.

If I was given* a bottle of this, for certain I wouldn’t wait 15 -20 years. The wine may not be over the hill but I certainly will :slight_smile: The times when I bought wines for aging that long are in the past now.

*I won’t be buying, I remember when Majestic at Farringdon had Penfold’s Grange Hermitage at an affordable price and the price now seems silly.

Incidentally, I see a photo of a Grange bottle in the 6 Wonders of the Wine World but when I click on it there are only four wines - and no Grange. But 2009 Grange is available at £340 a bottle

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Yes, I suppose when I say surely it will get better, I do mean better in my opinion, or to my taste. It might not suit everyone else. There are always some people with poorer taste! :wink:

But some part of my thinking is that if it will still be okay in 24 years, then it probably hasn’t reached its all round best yet. Even then all round best is a matter of taste too I suppose. It seems unlikely I will get a dozen or so to be able to do my own comparisons over time, or even one for that matter, so it just remains speculation. It caught my attention being offered as part of a Christmas case, presumably intended for drinking this Christmas. Somehow I found it slightly odd.

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I spotted a similar drink date conundrum today with this

TWS drink date is now to 2030.

I bought a case of this EP - largely based on my experience with other Saint Cosme wines. There’s virtually nothing about it on-line - it isn’t even mentioned on the Saint Cosme website.

In an effort to find out more, I emailed the estate and received a great reply telling me more. They recommend not touching for at least 10 years - ie drink from 2028. That fits better with my experience of white Hermitage. A long slumber in member’s reserves ahead!

Sorely tempted to buy another case too…

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I do remember the prices in the good old days(?) Peter Dominic had the 1978 for twenty quid. First growths weren’t that expensive either. 1986 Haut Brion at £35 a bottle! Oddbins had 1983 Margaux for £50. It seemed a lot at the time

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At a fabulous Wine Gang Penfolds masterclass a few years ago, I was struck by just how little Grange changed over the 8 or so years between the various years tasted. I’ve been lucky enough to have the 1991 on a few occasions which was also very similar. Interestingly, the bin 28 tasted alongside it of the same vintage was almost indistinguishable!

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That is a very decent wine normally

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Problem is that few people are wealthy enough when they are young enough to be able to wait until they are at their peak!

Have tried Hill of Grace and Grange (whilst working in the trade) and both wines had decades before they’d peak, certainly weren’t worth the price tags as a wine to be consumed young.

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