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"Corked" wine?

I have been a member of TWS for around 30 years and I think I’ve had my first corked wine. It was a PN from Oregon Lemelson Thea’s selection.
As I’ve never experienced a corked wine can anyone confirm that it was corked?

Musty on the nose.
No fruit and the musty dried out flavour was all there was on the palate.
I thought it might “blow off” but it didnt.
But what was most apparent was the taste went on and on and I couldn’t get rid of it until I resolved to open another bottle of full on Argentinian Cab Franc.

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Certainly sounds like it. Unlike some faults, it is likely to get worse as the bottle stays open.

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I’ve had a heavily corked wine - didn’t need to taste it, because there was an overwhelming smell of damp cardboard when the glass was poured.

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On the odd occasion it happens, I tend to put ‘corked’ wine into a jug lined with cling film and then cover over with cling film and refrigerate. On the couple of occasions I’ve tried it, it gets rid of the ‘corkiness’ in about 12 hours. And TBH, what have you to lose? Mentally, the bottle is a write-off anyway.

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That’s the classic cork indicator. I’ve only had it that strong once. A shame (was a bottle of Hermitage), but a useful learning experience.

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I’ve had only one obviously corked wine and a couple of probably corked wines in the last 10 years. Its getting less common, but that sounds corked to me!

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That’s a shame, @profavi! Do be sure to contact our Member Services department, as they will happily credit your account with the price of the corked bottle.

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I’m really poor at spotting a corked wine. Most other faults - easy.

I went on Jancis’ wine faults course and in the TCA round I could only spot it on the heaviest-dowsed example, so it seems that my snozzle lacks the right concentration of TCA receptors. I suspect that some of the wines I simply haven’t liked very much were corked and the only way to tell, for me, would be to have had an identical unopened bottle to try in its wake. Good thing / bad thing ? I suppose it means I end up chucking less wine away.

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I’m very similar, normally struggle to detect it. One of our friends is very sensitive to it, so if there is even a slight suspicion, she is the arbiter.

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I am envious. I am really sensitive to it and am always the one who picks it up, even on bottles where other friends can’t.

The most frustrating time it’s happened to me was last Christmas day, when having had Boris cancel our family Christmas I’d panic bought a dinner for the two of us including a bottle of 2003 Batailley that turned out to be corked. I discovered this about 5 minutes before serving.

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It wasn’t your first corked wine. It was the first you recognised as corked!

Now you have that taste, the next will be easier to spot and so on. I am not sure if this is a blessing or a curse.

People have different levels of susceptibility to cork taint. A wine that shrieks of cork taint to one will be happily drunk by another. At low levels it suppresses fruit and flavour, making the wine seem dull so you think it’s just a poor wine. It’s only when you open another bottle of the same wine that the difference is apparent.

Do report the wine to MS. Only by feeding back to the winery that their year’s work has been undone by their choice of closure, might they do something about it.

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A group of us booked a restaurant that had a good reputation for food as well as wine.
I selected a Rolly Gassmann Aligote to compliment our starters, mainly because I had tried a bottle from a different vintage of Gassmann and it was truly stunning.
Sadly this one howled of ripe blue cheese, it was not palatable.
We asked for assistance from the waiting staff, the Restaurant owner attended to help us.
He poured a glass, assessed the aroma and the wine itself and pronounced that the bottle was in perfect condition. :astonished: And we got to pay for it although it was not consumed!!
Needless to say, we did not go there again. :dragon:

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Is there a chance that this was a different grape or a different producer?

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Did you mean some other grape? I didn’t think Rolly Gassmann made aligoté.

But I would agree than anything they make is probably stunning, unless corked.

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Rolly Gassmann did produce a (some) great Aligote.
No idea if he still does.
The bottle that I tried was truly memorable and demonstrated that Aligote (in the right hands) was capable of terrific quality. :dragon:

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When was this? I’ve never come across Aligoté anywhere in Alsace, including at Rolly Gassmann, who have an extremely extensive list. Pretty sure that even if it were planted, you couldn’t mention it on the bottle.

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Quite a few years ago.
There is absolutely NO DOUBT in my mind that he did produce Aligote, but if he does not now; please let that be the end of it!! :grinning: :dragon:

A quick check says Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Muscat, Pinot Gris, Chasselas, Klevener, Pinot noir, Pinot blanc, Sylvaner and Auxerrois* are the only grapes permitted in AOC Alsace, with a subset of Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Muscat, Pinot Gris and Sylvaner allowed in Grand Crus. (If I was doing this off the top of my head I’d have forgotten the Klevener, which I’m pretty sure I’ve never had and the Pinot Noir, which I always forget about which is a shame as Alsace PN is great!).

*not to be confused with the area near Chablis or the synonym for Malbec in parts of the south west, which are, you know… exactly the same…

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Chardonnay permitted for Cremant I think and if bottled a la Z-H has to be labelled as VdF

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TWS used to sell a great value Klevener, I think by Mochel. I’m fairly sure that at the time they said Klevener was another local name for Pinot Blanc.

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