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Bring your own bottle

A local deli has just started doing this so I’m wondering what people’s thoughts are ?
I’m assuming the deli won’t be providing inert gas as they seal the bottles !
What if the bottles are returned for filling and they’re not clean, wine could easily be tainted … it’s probably going to be Pinot Grigio anyway :sweat_smile:!

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We used to get this all the time when we lived near a local shop with the same idea. Cheap wine but perfectly drinkable. Bottle is a water ‘jug’ now! The wine (used mainly for cooking - as in to drink while cooking) has been replaced by the 5l Jaume.

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didn’t Waitrose trial something similar earlier this year

got to love a bit of ‘vrac’

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In Crete back in the 80s this was the way to go…have you got rose wine…no we have ‘open wine’…yes, and it had been open for quite a while!

Do you get money back on the bottle? Watch for all the local enterprising feral urchins homing in on that one…

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In Brittany in the 90’s my father in law - proud to be a peasant (his words) - took me to his local wine merchant to fill up several 1.5 litre flip-top bottles with generic Côtes du Rhône. From a huge plastic tank, via a petrol station type hose.

I have to say, the CdR was great drinking - all strawberries and spice, 11 deg - to go WITH a meal, not to stand above it in a superior fashion. The father in law confided that ‘you cant go wrong with CdR’ - wise words.

It struck me at the time as totally sensible, especially in the French countryside. But not here, because we don’t do that kind of thing - and nobody is proud to be a peasant.

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Much more sensible ! Your own bladder … as such :wink:

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Well, can you actually ‘bring your own bottle’? Seems you have to buy their bottles, which you can then bring back to buy refills.

I don’t find it odd at all. They are not selling wine to lay down, but for you to have at the weekend. I think Le Grappin do the same when they are at the Oval or Herne Hill (might be mistaken though). Our farmers market also has an Italian outfit selling 3-4 wines the same way. I tried their Riesling and it was decent if unspectacular. As to the cleanliness of the bottle… it is your bottle, your effort.

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But I though thats what happens if you drink too much wine, you lay down.

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When I was about 10-12 years old, so late '60s, an aunt lived with a painter in rural Provence (all very Bohemian don’t you know!) and my two brothers and I visited one summer. They had this huge demijohn thing which was securely wrapped in wicker basket with a couple of big handles (took two adults to lift when full) with a tap at the bottom. This was taken up to the local vineyard in the back of their 2CV about once a week to be filled. The tap water at their house was not safe to drink but, of course, the wine was! It was an interesting set up all round. No fridge, of course, but an interesting porous jar filled with salted water with a slab of butter impaled on the lid and suspended inside both to keep it cool and mildly salt it.

We were there when a big (to my childish eyes) storm came through and in the morning we had to clear out all the snakes, lizards, scorpions and other nasties that had taken shelter in the house. A regular occurrence apparently.

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I was a (very unsuccessful) time-share shark for a month in the 1980s in Estepona. There was a stand-up bar in town that sold sherry by the glass or decanted into your own bottle. We (a rag-tag group of young British women who could just about order a plate of chips in Spanish) were a bit intimidated by drinking at the bar so we bought a bottle between us and drank it sitting on a wall in the evening sun of the Mediterranean.

It still ranks as one of my best drinks ever.

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Local supermarket is having a bit of a face-lift. It’s not finished yet, but it looks like we might be getting some of the same

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It’s definitely a thing. Mrs B went to visit a friend last night, decided to have a go on this new contraption and came home with a small glass or two. When I asked which wine she’d chosen, she just said “the one on the left”. When pressed further (she won’t normally choose red wine), she admitted that she thought it was going to be a rosé! However, she enjoyed it. £3 deposit for the bottle, £10 to fill it up.

With the help of a bit of zoom, it appear the one on the left is an Italian Sangiovese / Merlot blend. I wouldn’t have been able to determine this from tasting (which could well be my deficiencies). It’s the kind of wine that no one could be offended by, yet no one could be excited by. Perfectly gluggable, soft, ripe and juicy. No problems, but nothing to make you consider what’s in your glass.

I don’t think it represents great value at £10 a bottle, certainly compared to TWS wine. However, it’s an admirable attempt to help us to reduce our environmental impact locally and I hope it’s a success.

The bottle might be pretty decent for sloe gin too.

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For your sake, don’t enlighten her that Rose only has one ‘s’ and red (rosso) has two :slight_smile:

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I asked why the colour of the fonts of the different options hadn’t given it away but didn’t get a very polite response.

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