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Brexit (the swings and roundabouts)

Can we leave the personal politics out of this new thread and ask this simple question?
what do members think the effect of Brexit will have on the balance of the UK’s wine importing figures. For example (and it is only an example) will the New World wines now have more of an advantage with freer trade deals? How will the European wine countries change tack to win a bigger share of our market. I’m sure there will be other ideas out there, surely there will be change.
Remember keep the sniping out of this. Just wine words wanted!

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Given we have a trade deal with the EU, I don’t think there will be much change. This article also considers potential impacts, but was written before our deal was announced.

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I think things outside of Brexit may have a bigger impact in the balance of new world wines.

I see two competing forces in Australian wine (which for the most part in the UK is currently is either not great or seriously overpriced). The huge tariffs that’ve been put in place by their biggest non-domestic customer, meaning they’ll have to become more competitive elsewhere vs the current trend/need to reduce our carbon footprint as a planet (and thus potentially not bring quite so much in from the opposite side of the world). I’m not sure how these two will balance out in the long term, but in the short term I think we’ll definitely see an increase in value and quality in wine from Australia.

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Again not quite sure how Brexit or wine related this is, but I’ve also had several emails (and even a phone call on New Years Day!) trying to persuade me to relocate to Santiago de Chile either with funding for a start up or several very well paid jobs. Tempting.

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I think I’ll be importing less, from Spain in my case.

My understanding - very happy to be corrected - is that the overseas seller must register with HRMC, charge UK VAT and duty at time of sale and remit to the UK. However no wine seller that I use has announced their plans. Alternatively you will be charged those sums directly by HMRC before delivery (plus fees no doubt), with the resultant delays and bureaucracy.

This will probably make the wine more expensive and I’ll probably stick with UK sellers.

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Not sure this has anything to do with what you describe - but there’s a rather alarming article by Jane Anson in this month’s Decanter, about wine-related cyber attacks… Spooked the hell out of me! :ghost:

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I am waiting to see how this pans out with Decantalo, Gourmet Hunters et al. but yes, that’s probably the biggest personal impact. The increased red tape will make it less viable for my Spanish wine to come from Spain rather than UK suppliers, which will make it more expensive in a lot of cases (although trying to stay positive, TWS has had some incredibly competitive Rioja recently, although not the depth of range that I’d like and next to no anything else Spanish).

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As you mention, carbon footprint, and it’s side effects, how environmental issues will change production in Australia (along with elsewhere, tbh).

I’ll be honest and say I’ve not much knowledge of Australian wine production, and regions but certainly they’ve seen more extreme weather in recent years.

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Agreed. I drink a lot of sherry and the range in the UK is as nothing compared to that from those sellers.

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I dont think we should lose sight of the fact that the average price paid for a bottle of wine in UK is still about £5.50. The great British public are driven by price and prices are largely dictated by supermarkets. If their clout continues I suspect in the lower price range not a great deal will change.
As for the mid price/premium range prices will depend on cost of red tape and any duty increases imposed by HMG to help pay for covid furlough costs.

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The additional bureaucracy to import wine is staged: No change until 30 June 2021, UK VI-1 certificates thereafter, then from 1 October 2022, wine marketed in GB must be labelled with the name and address of an importer or bottler located within the UK.

Northern Ireland is a special case.

The labelling will be the biggest add-on cost (and it’s a field day for UK BASED wine importer’s who wish to operate as importers in name only) - but it’s a fixed cost no matter the value of each bottle. 50p (for instance, I have no idea) is considerable on a £5.99 bottle, but nothing on your average Lafite. Applies to all wines, EU or global.

Only exception will be native wines.

For TWS I imagine it will be pain, having to set up & integrate an additional process/ layer, employ staff to operate it… and pass the cost on to the members.

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When we joined the then EEC European wine didn’t get any cheaper. I don’t think Brexit will make any significant difference.

More effect has been, is and will from be UK taxation rates which are quite outrageous.

However, any price rises, shortages will be blamed (by some) on Brexit.

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Good point. Nothing to stop a sizeable TAX hike on ALL imported wines. I wonder if the UK will revert to the bad old days of importing grape must and manufacturing ‘wine’ here (Bristol Sherry anyone?)

We have left the EU.
That is a fact.
I did not agree that we should leave, but I (we) lost.
It is now up to those who said that the UK would do better outside this economic area.
The argument is lost, can we not leave it at that and enable the proponents of this notion, lead us into the brave new world that they promised us? :dragon:

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If prices rise because of increased bureaucracy I don’t think it is unreasonable to attribute that to Brexit.

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There’s always been British wine (i.e. wine not made from British grown grapes) on the shelves.

I think you are referring to ‘British sherry’ rather than Bristol sherry.

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If How will we know?

I wish, but there are plenty here who won’t let go.

Importers will tell us - 'because of the increased paperwork caused by Brexit we are reluctantly increasing prices etc etc…

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The arch Brexiteers wouldn’t let go since we joined the EU in 1973.

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