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Belgian Bottled wine


#1

I’ve come across a couple of older wines on auction sites which suggest the wines have been bottled in BELGIUM. One is a 1966 Echezeaux GC and a 1947 Petrus. They are both stated as being Belgian bottled, the later by Van der Meulen.
Does this mean they were bottled by a Belgian negotiant? or in fact taken to Belgium to be bottled?
Surely for such iconic and heavenly wine this sort of thing would be deemed to be sacrilege? Has anyone come across this before or can shed some light as to whether this was standard practice for wine produced in these vintages??


#2

Well, TWS used to bottle some wines so I imagine.it wasn’t all that unusual back in the day.


#3

Possibly, Would have imagined for wines of such outstanding quality they wouldn’t have taken them all the way to Belgium to bottle.


#4

Bottling at source is a relatively recent phenomenon. Importing countries, like England (and particularly Scotland) used to import casks and do the bottling locally.

You’ll find lots of wines, even up to the 50s and 60s, that were bottled locally. The Society definitely did that, and other older merchants did too. You’ll find that on the labels.


#5

Reminded me of this post by Tim Sykes from last year:


#6

Thanks for this @robert_mcintosh, this is a great read and I never realised that this was common practice with top end wines . You learn something every day :+1:.


#7

This topic reminded me of a video a came across some a little while ago that first introduced me to the concept of importer bottlings:


#8

Agreement between the top 6 Bordeaux chateaux (four 1st growths, + Mouton-Rothschild and Ch d’Yquem) led to them chateau bottling all their wines from the 1923 vintage ('24 for M-R).

But chateau bottling as standard came a lot later, chateaux sold barrels of wine, to be bottled by the buyer. That’s how butlers got their name…

I bought some '50s vintage classed growths bottled by Avery’s of Bristol when they were clearing their cellars in the 70s. The wines came with a uniform Avery’s label with the name of the chateau printed with a rubber stamp.

UK shippers such as Avery, Harveys, BBR etc enjoyed a high reputation for the quality of their bottling.


#9

Ah, Echezeaux. I am so happy I got to taste it before it became beyond my pocket. :smirk:


#10

@peterm my goodness … how old are you?? You must’ve been buying when you were 11 :see_no_evil::see_no_evil::see_no_evil::+1:!


#11

@leah Now you are my friend for life :slight_smile: