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Barefoot Wine (through dark glasses ;)


#1

When I’ve tasted Barefoot in the past - a glass of Merlot in one of the local pubs - I found it depressingly plonk and very sweet.

This was outside Marks & Spencer in St Albans this afternoon,

barefoot-st-albans-july-2019

On the trays they had Sauvignon Blanc and Malbec. The savvie was dry, not as crisp and gooseberry sharp as I prefer but better then many insipid savvies I’ve had in pubs. The Malbec wasn’t bad, fruit without jammy sweetness I associate with Barefoot.

One could taste any wine they had in the van. The only other red was a Shiraz and I was pleasantly surprised in that it was noticeably dry with tannins.

Would I rush out now and buy a bottle of Barefoot? Do I want TWS to list Barefoot? No and no, but I’m much more pleasantly disposed to them than I was before the tasting, and if there were a glass of Barefoot Shiraz in a pub I’d go for it, if only to taste it properly in a glass.

Horrible little plastic beakers of course; but I did score a pair of Barefoot branded sunglasses!


#2

This could start a trend, Yellow Tail next, Jacobs Creek! They could be queuing up like ice cream vans in a town near you, though I think they do so much market research that we would all find something we could drink from their ranges.


#3

I have never tasted Yellow Tail, but I remember when Jacob’s Creek first appeared and it was classy and pretty darn good.

They later went for volume and, well, you know the rest…


#4

I think Barefoot might be my nemesis. That’s not to say that it’s any worse than the other mass produced supermarket standards (possibly including Hardy’s, although I think they’re maybe a touch better) but I’ve had a couple of Christmases where my host thought it was appropriate to serve the merlot with the Christmas turkey. It wasn’t, and it’s as much as I can do not to swear about it.

The Jacob’s Creek Riesling is not entirely horrible, from what I recall.

Nice work on snagging the sunglasses though @peterm!


#5

Picture please! :sunglasses: :laughing:


#6

If you want a bit of fun, try pronouncing it “Yaakob’s Creek”. It will certainly confer an air of connoisseurship on you.


#7

I don’t think many people realise the size and reach of the likes of Gallo, 800 brands in total ! and they are all wanting to go upmarket even if that means they have purchased upmarket estates, there is a snob factor to many of these wines, Concho y Toro is a good example of a giant conglomerate that has some very good brands, the WS stocks some.

And PeterM is right Jacobs Creek was half decent until they expanded, yet again I had a very decent shiraz from them last year that was recommended, and for once they were right, in Decanter.
This gives a breakdown of these huge outfits , and the comments are split.


#8

This is a really interesting list, thanks for posting it. Full of good information, including a list of brands under each of the big brands.

Anyone else familiar with Lindemans? It’s an Australian company, dating back to the early nineteenth century. (It comes in number eight in this list.) I spend half my time in remote, rural New York, and, due to the arcane licensing laws there, it’s a two hundred mile drive to get to a decent liquor store. When I’m reduced to buying wine locally I usually buy one of the standard, cheap Lindeman wines, merlot or their red blend. They’re decent, certainly better than the Franzia or other American blend glop that’s pretty much what else is available.


#9

Lindeman were historically when independent a source of good to very good wines when I first got interested. Lindeman Pyrus was I think a well regarded Cab Sav and they also made a St George which was similarly well loved. The bin series such as the Bin 65 Chardonnay was a reliable mid market Chardonnay. They were taken over in one of the early consolidations of the Australian wine business. I recall early on they were part of the so-called PLO (Penfolds Lindeman Orlando) but they subsequently ended up where they are now after the Australian mega-mergers. I’m not familiar with the wines in their current incarnation.


#10

I think it has changed again since that article in 2015 like all big business mergers selling off acquisitions happen all the time, hard to keep pace with.