01438 741177         thewinesociety.com

Announcement and apologies

howto

#1

Firstly my apologies as I have not been a recent contributor to the community.

However I thought I would share my recent experience in Wine Education. I decided 3 years ago at the tender age of 54 to live a life where I would do what I wanted to do rather than what others wanted be to do, which is my definition of retirement.

I have loved wine since my late teens and had done a couple of WSET courses level 2 and 3. even after these and many bottles consumed I still didn’t feel equiped to taste and understand the mechanics of the wine trade. So I decided 2 years ago to do the WSET Diploma, which is a 2 year course largely for the wine trade professionals who want to advance their career.

I am happy to say I have just successfully completed the course. It became an obsession, my wine library expanded significantly and my wine tasting tools were wide and varied e.g. ‘Le Nez du Vin’ aroma kit.

I can say unreservedly that I feel much better prepared for my ongoing wine journey, still as an amateur but enjoying my wine much much more. Gone are the 250ml servings as are the 175ml glasses (where possible), and my eyes and palate are responding in ways that I had ignored for more than 30 years.

So if you’re up for a challenge and you have time to spare I would recommend you give it a go. The teaching ,methods of the wine trade are a little archane when I compare it to my previous industry IT, but I’m sure they will improve, indeed communities like this are a great step in the right direction.


#2

Hi @LeGris welcome to the community :smiley:

Good to hear you had such a good experience with the diploma - What take away points do you have and what advice would you recommend in approaching the course and assessments as there are a few on here who I believe are in the midst of the diploma.

Also…with 175/250ml glasses gone do you now just use a very long straw? :wine_glass::rofl:


#3

Taking this opportunity to say Hi to the Community as well! I second the initial comment; I am currently halfway through WSET Level 3 in London and having a blast.
Like a lot of Frenchies, I was a bit biased (and cocky!) to say the least, and tended to overestimate my actual knowledge. The course is spot on what I needed, a good and unbiased structure to learn and now I am a proud member of WS since late last year!

@LeGris Congratulations on the Diploma, did it cross your mind to continue towards the mountain of study that is MW?


#4

Congratulations on completing the Diploma , no easy feat for sure …
There are numerous discussions on here regarding the merits of structured wine education and the varying WSET levels so I thought I’d post a thread which may be of interest :wink:


#5

How many hours of study does the Diploma take?


#6

Lots - doing it whilst working was crippling for me

and lots of tasting hours too…so not all bad :wink:


#7

They recommend 600 hours, I’m sure I spent more but it is compulsive. I created all sorts of leading resources, flash cards, used text to speech tools etc. Happy to share.


#8

Level 2 is fairly straightforward for anyone that loves their wine. The blind tasting in 3 I believe is 2 wines but you are taught a systematics way of tasting which if you follow you will pass.


#9

I don’t intend to take it while I’m working and have young kids - maybe one day. Level 3 looks attainable.


#10

Same here! Maybe it can be a thing to do in retirement…


#11

For those with Level 3-ish (not required, and I know some people who’ve gone straight int) but without the time/resources to commit to the Diploma, I can recommend the Wine Scholar Guild courses. While they are a lot less “formal” in some ways (and comedically political at times) they’re great in-depth studies of France, Italy and Spain in more bitsized/affordable chunks than doing the diploma.

My only major gripe would be the lack of a tasting component in the exams.


#12

Although if you do the Italian one you’ll need to get used to the line “considered one of the finest pasitos” about every single pasito.


#13

I am aware , I am a diploma student :wink:
There are good discussions on that particular thread around the different levels

Agreed, I did laugh at “Champagne has a continental climate, with an Atlantic influence. :rofl::rofl:
Meanwhile the Atlantic influence on the Loire river ends 70 miles inland :rofl:!
Figure that one out :joy:.


#14

I passed WSET level 4 (Diploma) over 40 years ago when it was a fairly niche qualification. Cast your minds back and think how much the industry has changed since then, it has been quite a task keeping up!


#15

Congratulations @LeGris, what a fantastic achievement. You might then enjoy the TWSTaste events on this Community and your contributions would be very welcome!


#16

Yes heaven knows where it will be even in 10 years!


#17

Well seem to be following something similar. Now have WSET 3 and about to Chuck the 33 years of one industry in for a life of change. Just been to an organic vineyard in Portugal and contemplating heading back to do a harvest with foot crushing. Wine cellar has doubled and my wife has bought me a Coravin to help with moderated comparison. Diploma beckons for both off us.


#18

Thats a similar route I took. Your time in the vineyard will be invaluable as will be your Coravin, tasting is just practice !


#19

congratulations!
30 odd years ago I did WSET certificate and advanced certificate as they were called then. But my career took another path so I never moved to the next level.
Not too sure I want to anymore either.