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All the colours of France

The ones that caught my eye (ok, ok were pointed out to me - not had the printed version yet) were a couple of older vintage Noblaie wines from Chinon.

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Taken the opportunity to start my own Champagne ladder - six of the Society’s own label Champagne @£140 into members reserves. Repeat every year until I start withdrawing in 5 years…

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If organic wine starts to achieve significant sales advantages on price and/or volume, how long will it take for organic wine fraud to become widespread. Or is it already? I have no idea.

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Last night, I had a bottle of Quincy 2018 vin satis, tonight a bottle of cheninsolite ABiologique same result, Welted, are you sure about healthy wines, seems like a poor choice of words, unless that was just a little hickoop. And goodnight.

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I think the last time they checked - sometime ago I think, as people aren’t keen on checking these things - but ISTR something like an estimated 36 million ‘organic’ eggs in this country per annum, sold as such, were nothing of the sort.

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At least they were a fairly organic shape!

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When things get expensive…

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agree, I would welcome a more focused effort on certified low sulphur/organic/biodynamic wines.

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Might be useful to get a bit of insight into organic issues when/if we purchase through the Wine Society. If false claims are being made we should be made fairly and accurately aware of it instead of perhaps bending to marketing ploys and persuasive selling tactics on the part of the producers.

Not sure I’m quite following you. Do you think TWS has some way of detecting fraud that the licensing authorities don’t? I presume TWS can only, in general, pass on the information it’s given, and cannot be expected to verify the practices in every vineyard. Or am I missing your point?

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Before any anyone gets excited about whether the WS should or should not be more aware of what is going on in the world of wine, they really should look outside their ‘bubble’ and see who has been conned on a far bigger scale than worrying about whether anything is certified organic or not, it really is not that important, most wineries today are in line with most farming practices, and growing grapes is farming!
What is used today is nothing compared with the past and would anyone turn down an '82 Bordeaux because it was not certified?
Anyone can be conned, even the most knowledgeable of buyers /collectors and organics doesn’t even come into it.


The bottom line is as log as the wine is not poisoned, and that is a matter of conjecture it doesn’t matter the proverbial, it is what is in the bottle what counts, as elsewhere the world is becoming obsessed with boundaries that cannot be crossed because a minority say so, the WS does a good job in presenting wines that are attractive drinkable and have good provenance, having the full monty organic bio stampings may make a percentage of buyers feel they are buying into something, good for them but do not try as with nonsense elsewhere of veganism try to impose on others those beliefs, we are I hope ll capable of making a decision without ‘help’ in these matters.
No doubt I will receive the usual opprobrium for having the wrong opinion , but I really don’t care.
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Just as a point of order but you’ve just dismissed others opinions out of hand, and then pre-empted any response by suggesting any criticism of your post is ‘usual’.

This is illogical. Either you’re happy to both give and receive criticism, or you’re delving into the very snowflakism you claim to be diametrically opposed to.

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I think once the fact of being certified is more commonplace and accepted by producers and distributors, we can expect fraud or bad practice to be eliminated to the extent that other normal practice can be expected to largely free of fraud and bad practice. Consumer pressure would act quickly here and we wouldn’t get the headlines in organic production any more than other areas. So this is perhaps a long way of saying TWS brings organic produce more clearly to the market, without obviously doing the job of the licensors and consumer pressure will ultimately bring fraudulent practice to an end. That’s my vision anyway!

I’m confused, further up in this thread you say you agree with @Brocklehurstj when he discussed the issues one winemaker had with becoming organically certified , yet you are still focusing on certification being the ultimate goal for all wineries .
Surely it’s more important that vineyards are farming sustainably and not pumping heavy metals into the soils than ignoring this in the pursuit of organic certification ?
Wine fraud is a completely different issue, I’m sure the individuals who dumped all the fake yellow tail across London aren’t bothered about whether the original wine is organic or not .

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Always happy to receive criticism as long as it about what I have said as long as it is about the subject and not some oblique item someone has picked up, I do not dismiss anyone’s opinion out of hand, but I do reserve the right to have an opinion even if it does not fall into the mainstream on here or anywhere else.
Sadly many others on here who against the majority consensus get the same comments, they all have right to their opinions, without that it all becomes as so often an echo chamber, and you have just joined that club.
You as with so many do not read before commenting, there is nothing in what I said that is not preventing anyone having a different opinion including you, but do not distort what is written, and you fail to comment on any matter in my comment, just give an overall opinion about nothing in the comment but your opinion on it.
Where do I mention snowflake is a good example?

Ok, so can you describe to me in which way a vegan tried to ‘impose’ their views on you?

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