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Alchoholism amongst over 65s


#1

There is a problem with alcoholism amongst over 65s * “Over-65s drink unsafe’ alcohol levels”
This report is written for the Welsh Government but i know the same problems exist in the rest of the UK. I myself am aware of the dangers of drink so keep limits on my drinking. It would be quite easy to have a glass of wine every day but in practice we limit it to thursday saturday sunday monday. I often have fast days on fridays.


#2

Your approach is sensible. I read a similar story last week. Quite sad.

There may be no safe levels. Different people react differently to alcohol consumption. Moderation and regular health checks are key.


#3

Think I’ll wait until I’m 65, only 57 today.


#4

I have been following the 5:2 regime food- wise for about 4-5 years. I wasn’t hugely overweight but wanted to permanently shift about half a stone and it has worked brilliantly. It is not difficult to follow as there is always a day of normal eating to follow. Ironically Mr JayKay is under weight and struggles to find a weight gain regime he is happy with. Currently includes a glass of full fat milk per day made into a milk shake with an extreme weight gain powder mixed in. He is still as thin as a rake but has managed to add a couple of kilos… he just isn’t built for weight gain poor chap, but it’s not a problem that gets much sympathy.

Booze wise we have three alcohol free days a week, and have recently cut down the total units we drink when we do. It’s a bit of a struggle as we really enjoy what we drink. But I don’t think we are heading towards dependency - a couple of times a year we have extended booze free weeks just to show we can do it, though it is a bore.

We also exercise four times a week. It’s a lifestyle that suits us. However I’m sure we’d no doubt be classed as drinking more than is good for us. Neither of us has ever smoked, and we don’t do recreational drugs, so alcohol is the only abusive drug we allow into our systems :clinking_glasses::cocktail::wine_glass::tropical_drink::tumbler_glass::champagne:


#5

Theres plenty of people who drink too much. I have also met people who


#6

I’m a police officer. My old boss retired last year at 48!!

Sadly no chance of that happening for me. 60 will be my retirement if I make it that long


#7

I know there are plenty of people of all ages who drink too much. Try Saturday night in Colchester high Street.

I think you missed my sarcastic note.:crazy_face:


#8

I like to drink every day. Years ago, I found myself having “just one more small glass …” and sometimes drinking too much. So now, if at home, I pour my daily ration into a 250 ml carafe and that is what I drink. Drinking in a bar or restaurant in Ontario works, because by law their measure is 6oz or 9oz - 9oz being very close to 250 ml.

Coffee, I’m physically addicted to. If I’m late with my coffee, I get really bad headaches + anxiety. Wine, occasionally I simply forget to drink (for instance, if traveling in the evening) and there are no ill effects.


#9

Drinking too much is not the same as alcoholism

What is ‘too much’ is a matter of opinion and changes with the time.

If I had to move to a care home I would want to drink myself to a comfortable blur.


#10

I get a little frustrated by this sort of thing. Yes, of course, excess alcohol is bad for you, but so is too much red meat, any smoked food, caffeine, bread… The list is endless, in fact pretty much anything, even water, is bad for you in excess. I want to be healthy but what’s the point if I’m miserable. I don’t consider I consume anything in excess but having a bottle of wine every 5-7 days would by some measures be considered too much. And I’m afraid I say tough! :wink:


#11

I might say something a bit stronger to anyone who told me a bottle of wine every 5 days was ‘excessive’.


#12

Ah but I almost never have a wine free day. One glass, small or large, every day.


#13

You would probably get it confiscated…although even in a ‘blur’ you would probably talk more sense than many of the other occupants these days…life expectancy and quality of life are two different things in some cases sadly.


#14

And look where that got you, gadding about up and down mountains in your 60s. Can’t possibly be any good for you :wink: !


#15

I think it was Clement Freud who said “If you resolve to give up smoking, drinking and loving, you don’t actually live longer; it just seems longer”…

If you ignore the smoking bit - I kind of see what he meant :blush:


#16

If you did that you soon die of Sclerosis of the Liver.


#17

If you have to move into a care home (as opposed to a residential home) then it may be that one’s quality of life is already compromised and sclerosis of the liver is either one of the reasons you are in there or something else to add to your other health issues. Either way, being told to stop drinking for your health is probably irrelevant by then.


#18

Anyone unfamiliar with the theory of cognitive dissonance should Google it in relation to discussions like this!!


#19

A couple years back I was chatting to an old friend about various health things and I asked how her quitting smoking was going. She replied she hasn’t really quit, only stopped until she turns 72.

I think she was serious, and I also think she makes a good point.


#20

There are health benefits for men over 40 who drink red wine you know ! The same benefits have unfortunately not been found for women , so I think you’re good to go :wink::+1:!